Getting Google Earth working in Linux Mint 18.x

I had been delaying an upgrade from Mint 17.3 to 18 because when I tried 18.0, Google Earth stopped working. Things were no better with Mint 18.1 or Mint 18.2. The problem was, Google Earth would install and start to run, but hang on start-up and go into a mostly unresponsive state. It would look something like this:

 

Google Earth 7.3.0.3832 blowin’ up in Linux Mint.

 

I did some research, tried safe mode, checking that all dependencies were satisfied and different video drivers. This was happening on any machine I installed on so I knew it wasn’t hardware.

To make a long story short, as of October 2017 the best solution I’ve found is to install an older version of Google Earth. It appears that Google Earth Pro 7.1.8.3036 build date 1/17/2017 installs and works as it should. Even the Photos load. There’s a thread on the Mint forums discussing this issue:

https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=251945

 

And according to said thread, the GE support team made version 7.1.8.3036 64bit (.deb) available for download at:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bx0YZ3Xi3rgTcTNjelJwUEVkNDQ/view

 

Use this source at your own risk. I got it and it appears legit. If it was bogus, I tend to think the Linux Mint forum people would flag it. Might be a good idea to keep that .deb file backed up for future use.  🙂

 

Google Earth Pro 7.1.8.3036 working in Linux Mint 18.2. Life is good again. Unless that’s your RV.

 

  • Kenn Ranous

 

Update, 1.19.18 Linux Mint 18.3:

The same problem still exists and the same solution still applies. Use version 7.1.87.3036.

Caution! If you perform a ‘sudo apt update/upgrade from the command prompt, GE will get updated to the newer non-functioning version. If that happens, use Synaptic Package Manager to completely remove GE then reinstall using the .deb file you downloaded earlier (and hopefully saved). When update manager prompts you to update, right-click and select ‘ignore …’. Also go into SPM and type google earth in the search bar. Left-click it once and click Package > Lock Version. This will prevent Update Manager or Synaptic from accidentally upgrading you to the newer non-working version, however, performing a sudo apt upgrade from the command prompt will still force the upgrade.

 

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